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Applying for the F1 Visa

applyingforF1

Applying for an F1 Visa at a United States Consulate


Appointments are required for all non-immigrant visa applicants. Visit http://www.usembassy.gov to locate the embassy or consulate near you. For additional information you may wish to visit the new website by the Department of Homeland Security - http://studyinthestates.dhs.gov


You will need to submit the documents to the consular officer at the interview:


  • The I-20 AB
  • The CCM acceptance letter
  • A passport that is valid for at least 6 months after your proposed date of entry into the United States
  • The visa application fee and visa application forms.
  • The $200 SEVIS I-901 confirmation receipt www.fmjfee.com
  • Financial evidence showing that there is sufficient funds to cover your tuition & expenses during your period of study at CCM. The Affidavit of Support completed by your United States sponsor FORM I- 134 will be sent to you with the I-20 AB.


How to Pay the Federal SEVIS I-901 Fee


An F-1 visa will not be issued unless the Visa officer can verify that the SEVIS I-901 fee payment has been made. You must pay the SEVIS F-visa applicant fee if you are seeking an initial entry IE F-1 visa from an embassy or consulate abroad and/or if you are already in the United States submitting a change of nonimmigrant status to F-1 COS. The current SEVIS I-901 fee is $200.00.


Currently, there are two payment methods:


  • Payment in U.S. dollars by credit card over the internet
  • Payment in any country's currency through an agent of Western Union "Quick Pay". There are agents in more than 130 countries.

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Access the I-901 fee on their website:

http://www.fmjfee.com


* Before scheduling your visa interview, you may wish to review these points:


Ties to your home country

Under U.S. law, all applicants for non immigrant visas, such as F-1 visas, are viewed as intending immigrants until they can convince the consular officer that they are not. Thus, you should be able to demonstrate that you have significant ties to return to your home country rather than to remain in the U.S. A "tie" to your home country may be your place of residence, job prospects, family, investments, bank account, etc.

Anticipate that the interview will be conducted in English

Be comfortable in explaining why you plan to study in the U.S.

Know the academic program that you have been accepted to

We recommend that you review our website for curriculum information on your program of study. You should be able to explain how completing a degree in the U.S. relates to your future professional career plans.