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Marianna Borrero

Marianna Borrero

Hometown: Roxbury
Major: Nursing

She’s a student athlete, president of the Student Government Association, active in her church, works a part-time job, runs on a regular basis and earns good grades. Marianna Borrero of Roxbury obviously has some strong time management skills and is geared for success. She also is quick to point out that her ability to juggle multiple responsibilities and interests is the result of the support and guidance she receives from her parents, Juan and Corine.

She pulls out her phone and reads one of her favorite text messages from her father, a quote from Helen Keller: "Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet.Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened."

"He’s a mind-over-matter person and he believes in becoming a better person," says Borrero.From her mother, she has learned money management skills and an appreciation for the practical.

"She wouldn’t even let me look at other colleges," says Borrero. "She wanted me to start here at CCM because it doesn’t make sense to finish college with a whole lot of debt."

Borrero is glad for that decision, too. "This is a very teaching-oriented school.The professors really care about their students." There also are plenty of ways for students to get involved, she notes.

At CCM, she has been able to pursue her love of soccer as a member of the Women’s Soccer team. As president of the Student Government Association this academic year, she also is spreading the message that taking part in a student group can be a life-changing experience.

"One of my friends didn’t join a club and was miserable his first semester. Then he joined a club and he has made so many friends."

Borrero’s goal is to become a nurse. It’s a desire that sprung from a most unfortunate incident but one that also reflects her determination to make the best of every situation.

She was 11 years old and out bicycling with her dad on one of the many long bike trips they like to take, generally 20-plus miles. "A man was on the ground. He had had a heart attack and died," she recalls. "It was a moment where I realized I want to help whoever I can by learning whatever I can. It’s giving back that matters."